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ISO

Updated: May 25


Have you ever said, "My pictures are turning out too dark!" "What's wrong with my camera?"

There are many ways to adjust your camera so that the pictures are not dark. The most important to understand is the "ISO" setting.

What is ISO? Dictionary.com says ISO is an abbreviation for International Standardization Organization.

Film was made to a standard to be able to capture objects traveling at different speeds. You do not have to think of your ISO setting as film speeds, but that is the background for it's numbering. What you need to know is the basics of the film speed and the purpose of the speed.

ISO numbers can range from 100 to 800 with film, but almost everyone uses a digital camera now so I will speak of these numbers in digital terms, but the information is the same for film (the only difference being each film frame on one roll of film is one speed. Film frame to film frame the ISO speed never changes.) With our digital technology we are able to use higher ISO speeds, but do be aware that higher ISOs may cause you pictures to be "grainy". Some cameras lose picture quality with higher ISOs and become very difficult to work with in lower lit areas.

How does the ISO affect the photo? The lower the ISO number the slower the object of your photograph should move. If you want to take photos of your child's sporting event you will want to use a higher number ISO such as 800.

If your photo is too dark for you, then set a slightly higher ISO and try bringing your shutter speed up so that you can capture faster motion.

And now you are Standardized for the International Organization. Enjoy!

Additional information can be found at: http://www.digital-photography-school.com/iso-settings

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